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Asian Crockpot Pulled Pork with Apples

by | Food

I was going to call this recipe “Asian-inspired”, but is it still inspired by Asia when I am Asian?  And does pulled pork have to be BBQ?  Well, my husband is not Chinese (he looks like Beck), but he makes a mean Asian Crockpot Pulled Pork.  I guess I’ll live with that title for now.  This recipe, like all my recipes, is super easy, and uses my condiment of choice, soy sauce!

crockpot_apple_pork-1

So, if you are unfamiliar with the way I cook, I can’t follow directions very well.  I do the random sprinkling of spices and additions of flavors and hope for the best.  Drew cooks the same say – a little of this, a little of that.  This little experiment turned out incredibly successfully, and we’ve recreated it multiple times, so now it’s ok to share with you all!

Note to self: do not write food posts in the afternoon.  Just like “do not surf Pinterest right before dinner”.  gurgle gurgle…

Asian Crockpot Pulled Pork

Asian Crockpot Pulled Pork
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 8
Ingredients
  • pork shoulder – exact poundage not necessary
  • 1 apple, cored and quartered
  • 1 onion, cut into large chunks
  • equal parts soy sauce and water
  • a few slices of ginger
Instructions
  1. Rinse off pork shoulder and lay in crockpot.
  2. Add apple, onion and ginger.
  3. Add equal parts soy sauce and water to almost cover the pork. Suggestion: increment in 1/2C of each. The total amount will depend on the size of your crockpot and your pork. If you’d like it to be less salty, alter the ratio of soy sauce to water.
  4. Turn crockpot on Low and let cook for 6 hours or until you can’t stand the delicious aroma any longer.
  5. Serve over rice and garnish with chopped green onions.

This is becoming one of our go-to dishes for when we have company, since you can prep it and leave it.  Not that we have company all that often, but you still need a few tricks up your sleeve!  I like to stir fry up some greens and other vegetables to serve on the side for a family-style meal.  Since this recipe generates a lot of liquid, I like to use the leftover “sauce” as a broth base for noodle stir-fries (lomein) or noodle soups even after all the pork has been devoured.

Give it a try and let me know how you like it!

8 Comments

  1. Lisa @ Wine & Glue

    ChiWei, you totally crack me up! Can it be called Asian inspired if I’m Asian? I laughed out loud. This looks AMAZING! There are three million things I love about it, and the photo is so gorgeous I want to frame it. Pinning!

    Reply
    • ChiWei

      Haha, thanks! You’re too funny, you made my day 🙂 I was having so much trouble coming up with a title because I see so much “asian-inspired” stuff these days, so I just gave up. Thanks for the pin Lisa!

      Reply
  2. Nutmeg Nanny

    This looks amazing! I have to confess I never go Asian inspired in my house because I’m allergic to sesame and just always assume every recipe is filled with it. I’m so happy to see that I’m totally wrong! I cannot wait to try this. It’s perfect for cold winter days 🙂

    Reply
    • ChiWei

      Thanks Brandy! Don’t get me wrong, I have the gallon of sesame oil in my pantry, but I don’t use it too often. It has a very distinctive taste and sometimes it’s just too strong. But you do see it a lot in the “asian-inspired” stuff in restaurants! I normally just stick to soy sauce 🙂

      Reply
    • ChiWei

      It was delicious, lol! Have fun with it!

      Reply
  3. Sarah

    This looks absolutely yummy. I can’t wait to try this. My husband loves Asian food so this would fit the bill.

    Reply
    • ChiWei

      Good luck! Not that you need it, this meal comes together really quickly – I’m sure you’ll make it wonderfully!

      Reply

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