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The Adirondack Wrap Crochet Pattern

by | Accessories, All Designs, Crochet, Free Patterns, My Favorites

The Adirondack Wrap uses shapes and colors to create to a long, light and flowing wrap that can also be worn as a scarf. It’s deceptively simple design makes it perfect for on-the-go crocheting, watching-tv crocheting, and sip-and-stitch crocheting! 

Gorgeous drape and color striping.

And boy, did I find that out about projects that are good for sip-and-stitch crocheting! After an amazing trip to New York City to meet my favorite yarn friends and see Lion Brand’s offices, I’ve learned how important it is to have a mindless, simple project on hand. Always. I did bring a current project, but it required following a predetermined design, and counting rows, which I found extremely difficult (read: impossible) when standing at a bar, or paying attention in a meeting, or having a conversation with anyone and still hope to speak coherently. I’m still processing all the different things I did, and things I saw, and things I ate, and conversations I had from the trip, and will share more with you later.

Add a shot of color to your wardrobe with The Adirondack Wrap

As for the inspiration for this wrap scarf, I do a lot of perusing of knit, crochet and fashion photos to find ideas, and I found myself gravitating towards those long knit wraps that stretch from fingertip to fingertip, so I made my own crochet version. It stretches about 8 feet long and 2 feet wide. Unlike triangle wraps, it doesn’t have a center point down the back, but it is in fact, made from triangles! There’s 3 triangles in this wrap, connected together to make a trapezoid. The geometry geek in me is loving all these triangles I’ve been working with, first with the Love Triangles Blanket and then the Tangram Wrap.  I just rewatched Hidden Figures today and these projects remind me of the part in the movie when a young Katherine finds geometric shapes in stained glass windows. 

Wear the Adirondack Wrap as a shawl.

The Adirondack Wrap consists of 3 identical crochet triangles seamed together, using 3 skeins of Lion Brand Mandala Yarn, one for each triangle. If you are able to choose your 3 skeins in person (I bought mine in person at Walmart), you can pick skeins that have similar color patterns, so that the outside rings of color are the same. Pull from the center to work your triangle, and the outer rows of each triangle might be in the same color family. When you seam up those 3 triangles, the seams are nearly invisible, just showing a single color weaving a big W through the wrap. If you can’t choose your skeins, the mattress stitch used to seam the triangles together can still create a band of color between each triangle, creating its own unique pattern.

Adirondack Wrap

The pattern for each of the triangles is super easy. Every row is a variation of double crochet stitches, with increases at the ends and in the middle chain space. Every fourth row uses either a cross double crochet or a mesh double crochet motif to add variety and texture. Also, by using Mandala, you don’t ever have to change yarns to get the gorgeous color changes, the self-striping yarn does it for you. 

Remember to block the triangles once they are complete. I blocked all 3 on top of each other to ensure they all had the same shape, and I did stretch them out to the full triangle shape that I wanted.

Blocking the triangle. Blocking the triangles

I call this a Wrap, but it can easily be a super cozy super scarf too! As long as you use lighter weight yarn, the wrap scarf bundles up really well, and the tassels give it a fun touch at the ends.

Adirondack Wrap also works as a super scarf

The free pattern is below, but there are other options available for you if you’d like to work offline, or if you can’t find the yarn in your local big box store.

Check out Etsy, or Ravelry to purchase an inexpensive and printable PDF for offline use. This document presents the pattern in a simple and easy to read format, without ads or comments.

Lion Brand also has The Adirondack Wrap available as a full kit, which includes your choice of Mandala Yarn and a copy of the pattern I’ve shared below. The kit does not include the hook or other notions.

All options below!

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Purchase the pattern from Etsy

Purchase the pattern from Ravelry

Add to your Ravelry Queue

Purchase the kit from Lion Brand

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A deceptively simple yet beautiful Adirondack Wrap, made using Lion Brand Mandala Yarn. Free pattern from 1dogwoof.com

Supplies

Abbreviations

Pattern Notes

  • Skill level Easy.
  • Gauge is 15 sts and 8.5 rows in 4 inches.
  • Overall size is approximately 92 inches long and 24 inches wide.
  • The pattern uses the following shorthand descriptions:
  • row-f: Ch 3 (counts as st). Work 1 dc in same st.
  • row-m: Work [2 dc + 2 ch + 2 dc] in ch sp.
  • row-e: Work 2 dc in last st.
  • cross-st: Skip 1 st. Work 1 dc into next st. Work 1 dc into previously skipped st.
  • mesh-up: Ch 1, skip next st, work 1 dc into next st.
  • mesh-dn: Work 1 dc into next st. Ch 1 and skip next st.

Cozy, colorful and versatile.

Adirondack Wrap Pattern Instructions

Triangle (make 3)

Row 1: Work [3 dc, 1 ch, 3 dc] into magic circle. Do not join the magic circle. (6)

Row 2: Work row-f, 1 dc in each of next 2 st, row-m, 1 dc in each of next 2 st, row-e. (12)

Row 3: Work row-f, 1 dc in each of next 5 st, row-m, 1 dc in each of next 5 st, row-e. (18)

Row 4: Work row-f, 1 dc in each of next 8 st, row-m, 1 dc in each of next 8 st, row-e. (24)

Row 5: Work row-f, 5 cross-st, 1 dc in next st, row-m, 1 dc in next st, 5 cross-st, row-e. (30)

Row 6: Work row-f, 1 dc in each of next 14 st, row-m, 1 dc in each of next 14 st, row-e. (36)

Row 7: Work row-f, 1 dc in each of next 17 st, row-m, 1 dc in each of next 17 st, row-e. (42)

Row 8: Work row-f, 1 dc in each of next 20 st, row-m, 1 dc in each of next 20 st, row-e. (48)

Row 9: Work row-f, 11 mesh-up, 1 dc in next st, row-m, 1 dc in next st, 11 mesh-dn, row-e. (54)

Row 10: Work row-f, 1 dc in each of next 26 st, row-m, 1 dc in each of next 26 st, row-e. (60)

Row 11: Work row-f, 1 dc in each of next 29 st, row-m, 1 dc in each of next 29 st, row-e. (66)

Row 12: Work row-f, 1 dc in each of next 32 st, row-m, 1 dc in each of next 32 st, row-e. (72)

Row 13: Work row-f, 17 cross-st, 1 dc in next st, row-m, 1 dc in next st, 17 cross-st, row-e. (78)

Row 14: Work row-f, 1 dc in each of next 38 st, row-m, 1 dc in each of next 38 st, row-e. (84)

Row 15: Work row-f, 1 dc in each of next 41 st, row-m, 1 dc in each of next 41 st, row-e. (90)

Row 16: Work row-f, 1 dc in each of next 44 st, row-m, 1 dc in each of next 44 st, row-e. (96)

Row 17: Work row-f, 23 mesh-up, 1 dc in next st, row-m, 1 dc in next st, 23 mesh-dn, row-e. (102)

Row 18: Work row-f, 1 dc in each of next 50 st, row-m, 1 dc in each of next 50 st, row-e. (108)

Row 19: Work row-f, 1 dc in each of next 53 st, row-m, 1 dc in each of next 53 st, row-e. (114)

Row 20: Work row-f, 1 dc in each of next 56 st, row-m, 1 dc in each of next 56 st, row-e. (120)

Row 21: Work row-f, 29 cross-st, 1 dc in next st, row-m, 1 dc in next st, 29 cross-st, row-e. (126)

Row 22: Work row-f, 1 dc in each of next 62 st, row-m, 1 dc in each of next 62 st, row-e. (132)

Row 23: Work row-f, 1 dc in each of next 65 st, row-m, 1 dc in each of next 65 st, row-e. (138)

Row 24: Work row-f, 1 dc in each of next 68 st, row-m, 1 dc in each of next 68 st, row-e. (144)

Row 25: Work row-f, 35 mesh-up, 1 dc in next st, row-m, 1 dc in next st, 35 mesh-dn, row-e. (150)

Row 26: Work row-f, 1 dc in each of next 74 st, row-m, 1 dc in each of next 74 st, row-e. (156)

Row 27: Work row-f, 1 dc in each of next 77 st, row-m, 1 dc in each of next 77 st, row-e. (162)

Row 28: Work row-f, 1 dc in each of next 80 st, row-m, 1 dc in each of next 80 st, row-e. (168)

Row 29: Work row-f, 41 cross-st, 1 dc in next st, row-m, 1 dc in next st, 41 cross-st, row-e. (174)

Row 30: Work row-f, 1 dc in each of next 86 st, row-m, 1 dc in each of next 86 st, row-e. (180)

Row 31: Work row-f, 1 dc in each of next 89 st, row-m, 1 dc in each of next 89 st, row-e. (186)

Row 32: Work row-f, 1 dc in each of next 92 st, row-m, 1 dc in each of next 92 st, row-e. (192)

Row 33: Work row-f, 47 mesh-up, 1 dc in next st, row-m, 1 dc in next st, 47 mesh-dn, row-e. (198)

Row 34: Work row-f, 1 dc in each of next 98 st, row-m, 1 dc in each of next 98 st, row-e. (204)

Row 35: Work row-f, 1 dc in each of next 101 st, row-m, 1 dc in each of next 101 st, row-e. (210)

Row 36: Work row-f, 1 dc in each of next 104 st, row-m, 1 dc in each of next 104 st, row-e. (216)

Row 37: Work row-f, 53 cross-st, 1 dc in next st, row-m, 1 dc in next st, 53 cross-st, row-e. (222)

Row 38: Work row-f, 1 dc in each of next 110 st, row-m, 1 dc in each of next 110 st, row-e. (228)

Assembly

  • On the 3rd (last) triangle, leave a long tail for seaming.
  • Lay out the triangles as shown in figure below. Place the 3rd triangle so that the long tail starts at the red dot.

Adirondack wrap, assembly

  • Seam the 3 triangles together in the direction of the dotted line, using the mattress stitch.
  • Weave in all ends.
  • Make 2 tassels and attach one to each far corner, as indicated by blue dots.

Seaming pieces together

I really love this particular colorway in Mandala Yarn, as it reminds me of the changing fall foliage back home in the Hudson Valley. If you make it with other color choices, let me know, I’d love to see how it turns out!

This scarf wrap is so versatile, I’d also love to see how you style it!

Gorgeous colors and a simple design make this the perfect on-the-go crochet project, and results in a long, light and flowing scarf wrap. | 1dogwoof.com

Check out my pattern shops on Etsy and Ravelry where you can purchase printable PDFs of my latest crochet patterns. These PDFs are formatted without comments or ads, and have instructional photos at the bottom for optional printing.

I sometimes include affiliate links in my supply lists. Purchasing from these merchants earns me a small commission with no extra cost to you, and goes towards supporting One Dog Woof.

Please be respectful and do not sell or distribute this pattern in any way, especially as your own. Instead, share the original blog post link! You can sell finished products made from this pattern by giving credit to One Dog Woof as the pattern designer and linking to the blog post. If you have any questions regarding distribution or translation of this pattern, please see my Terms of Use. Thank you for your consideration!

109 Comments

  1. Laura

    Such a beautiful pattern! I have made it to row 34 but am having some trouble. Row 33 came out fine with 47 mesh-ups on the one side and 47 mesh-downs on the other. I only ended up with 95 dcs on my first pass back however. I have looked and looked and cannot find a missed stitch or anything of the sort to equal the 98 dcs the row was supposed to have. Any suggestions? Thanks!

    Reply
    • Ayana

      Happened to me a few times and I don’t know why. I added stitches right before row m

      Reply
  2. Patricia Martinez

    Love this pattern and I’m done with the second triangle. My question, why doesn’t it match my first one? I’ve counted each row, they are both the same, but one is smaller. Will blocking fix this problem? There is about a 4 row difference.

    Reply
    • ChiWei

      Yes, blocking can fix a certain amount of difference in the triangle sizes, but the problem is most likely in the tension you used to make each triangle. Also, once you seam the triangles together, the size difference will be less noticeable. 🙂

      Reply
  3. Jessica

    Hi there! How would you recommend working up a gauge swatch? I was thinking just straight dc, but I’ve never really switched before. Thanks!

    Reply
    • Jessica

      *Swatched.

      Reply
  4. net worth

    What a great project to work this weekend! I guess I will make a all-white one, hehe. I’m still a newbie.

    Reply
  5. Chris

    Thank you so much for sharing a different take on the triangle shawl. I just got home from the hospital today to begin a month of mandatory recovery in bed. I had planned for it by getting several skeins of Mandala yarn. Now I know my first project. ????

    Reply
  6. Christy

    This is a beautiful pattern! I’ve spent weeks searching the internet for a pattern for my mandala yarn hoard and kept coming back to this one! Everything is really clear and I love the pics, but I have a few suggestions as edits: 1) for row 1 you don’t say to ch 3 and count as first stitch, after making the magic circle, so the first dc ends up smooshed, 2) why not just write what the “rows” are in the pattern? When I printed it off I have to keep flipping the page. Just a little thing. and 3) when you say to work two dc in the last stitch in row e, specify you mean to work it in the top of the ch 3 from previous row (if I’m correct) These are newbie issues I’ve had that have tripped me up many times in other patterns.

    Reply
    • ChiWei

      Thanks for your feedback Christy!

      Reply
  7. Becky Collins

    I purchased this pattern but not clear how to start it? But don’t I need to have a chain started?

    Reply
    • Ayana

      Make a magic circle and crochet into that

      Reply
  8. Ayana

    I am a novice crocheter and want to try this pattern. Going back and forth from notes to pattern is confusing. Any plans to make it simpler. It’s beautiful

    Reply
  9. Trish

    I think I understand most of the pattern. The beginning is a bit confusing as I’m not used to working with a magic circle. Can I do a ch4, then 2 DC in the 4th CFH, ch 1, then 3 DC? Would this be the same thing?

    Reply
    • Trish

      I think I answered my own question. Yes, they both get the job done, but the magic circle allows you to cinch the hole closed neater and more tightly. Ok I’m about to try it using the mandala yarn Sphynx.

      Reply
      • ChiWei

        Hi Trish,

        Yes, I chose to start with a magic circle because it cinches tighter. But creating a loop with chain stitches works too!

  10. Trish

    For those people who, like me, thought this might be too complicated, it’s really not. Row f is the start of every row. Row m is in the middle, at the point of the triange. Row e is at the end. Each row works like this. The cross st, mesh up, and mesh down are just variations of double crochet stitches. *3 rows regular DC, 1 row cross stitch, 3 rows regular DC, 1 row mesh up/mesh down*.

    By the time you get through a few rows you can visualize the pattern and basically get rid of the notes. If you’re fairly familiar with shawls, it’s easy to memorize.

    Reply
  11. Summer Bjarnarson

    is the paid pattern of ravelry easier to understand, ie more directions. I usually can read patterms, but this is so confusing to me. I don’t mind paying the $3.00 if the pattern has more clearer directions then what is on this blog.

    Reply
    • ChiWei

      Hi Summer, the paid pattern is the same as what is on the blog. It is formatted for easy printing and for those who may not have constant access to the internet. Thanks!

      Reply
  12. Diana

    I follow the pattern but unfortunately my triangles are not looking the same, the colors don’t match each other when put together and each triangle the colors didn’t have the same length. I started each triangle from the center and I was sure all have the same colors but still no succes. Is there any Way to fix this? Any ideas?

    Reply
    • Trish

      The colors may not match depending on the yarn itself. You can force them to match by doing a certain amount of rows in each color. You may also be able to get them the same size by blocking them together, on top of each other. If this doesn’t work then your tension is off, or you may have done one with a different size hook. Thats my best guess. Good luck!

      Reply
      • ChiWei

        Thanks Trish! Yes, the yarn will vary, so you can either choose skeins that have similar gradation, or cut the yarn to match. I did block all 3 triangles on top of each other to ensure they are the same size.

    • ChiWei

      Hi, Thank you for your interest, but I do not allow translations to be published on other websites, as that is, in effect, copying my pattern for your own. Please email me directly if you have any further questions!

      Reply
  13. Reanna Bergman

    I’m almost done with my first triangle, but I’m discovering that the colors Lion Brand Yarn sent in my kit are nothing like your beautiful example. I haven’t seen Centaur in a store, but the balls I was sent don’t have the nice off white, the reddest color is more of a dusty rose, and there’s no sign of the brightest blue you have. It’s pretty, but definitely not what you were able to create. . .

    Reply
  14. Anne

    Is it possible to have a video of this, as a beginner i find it assists me to see visually? I love the shawl nice and big. Thanks

    Reply
  15. Ayana

    I bought the yarn for this project and have yet to start it. I am a novice crocheter and sometimes have a hard time following pattern. Any plans of making this pattern more user friendly or a video tutorial

    Reply
    • ChiWei

      Hi Ayana, I’m sorry, but I don’t have plans to make a video at this time. If I do, I will definitely share it here!

      Reply
      • Ayana

        Thanks I’m attempting it now

  16. Cynthia

    hi, can you explain how to attach the tassels. I bought the tassel maker kit and the instructions seem pretty easy, but attaching it to the shawl. I can’t visualize. Thank you 🙂

    Reply
    • ChiWei

      Hi Cynthia, once you have a tassel, I used the ends and tied it through any loop you find in the corner of the shawl. You can make a double knot and then weave in the ends. Thanks!

      Reply
  17. Martha Siler

    I am in tears over not being able to read this pattern as it is written and cannot receive assistance/explanation from the person from whom I purchased the pattern.
    Martha

    Reply
    • ChiWei

      Martha, As I replied on your original request, the “row-f”, “row-e”, “row-m” and others are abbreviations, as described in the Abbreviations section of the pattern. Wherever you see a “row-f” in the pattern, replace that with “Ch 3 (counts as st). Work 1 dc in same st.” and then work the rest of the row. Since every row starts with the same instructions, I used abbreviations as a shorthand so you wouldn’t have to print an extra pages. Whether you like the shorthand or not, that’s the way the pattern is written.

      As another example, everywhere you see “mesh-up” or “mesh-dn”, for example, “35 mesh-up”, it means “work [Ch 1, skip next st, work 1 dc into next st] 35 times.

      “Every row is a variation of double crochet stitches, with increases at the ends and in the middle chain space. Every fourth row uses either a cross double crochet or a mesh double crochet motif to add variety and texture.” So once you get through the first 8 rows, the pattern will have been completed and can be repeated from there on out.

      Thanks!
      ChiWei

      Reply
  18. Cynthia

    I LOVE this wrap! Made one in Pegasus and now currently making one on Spirit. This may be common sense, but can I shorten the amount of rows to make a smaller version for my nieces? And do you have a suggestion on a good stopping point, after the three rows of dc or one of the cross then a dc row? Thank you the pattern is so easy to make!

    Reply
  19. Ann

    Hello, I’ve got a quick question. I know you blocked all triangles together but, what method did you use? Wet, spray or steam? Love the pattern and almost done with my third triangle! Beautiful pattern, Thank you!!

    Reply

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